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20131202
20131210
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reducing the power to the yahoo news is that in patients with them. it is decided. mathematics and science studies. this tool provides a special time to go to the city meant to. it's been patient. listen to the computer science the mistake and made available to them. sports the same old students are able to progress the details in the race takes to stop the car on the stupid computer is acting to the top of that match my skin japanese companies have no clue the global race to recruit him. this sudoku killer bees to recruit me for saying more and more debt is at the start looking for good science graduates. the warm hearted comedy nice bt engineers has a plan to stay and grow. for the snow trying to build a connection with one of india's leading dance in unison. the institutional continue getting up to five games recruiters say european and american companies are only now starting to come here in oregon the ancient japanese firms are will position to snap up the bits you are different kinds. us soldiers led the new union team. you love it. this is a sin you could too bad it's good to eat. w
research in the world. basicssion is to do science to understand how life works at the most detailed level and to apply that in terms of coming up with new insights that will prevent and treat disease. support tens of thousands of grants across the country, conducted by our world's most cutting-edge scientists in the u.s. who are working on things from cancer to hiv, two aides. you name it -- to aids. you name it. let's learn more about the history. your roots date back to the late of thebut you are part department of health and human services. what is your budget and how many people work for nih? guest: it is about $29 billion. the number of people who work about on the campus is 17,000. most of our work is done by the grants that we give to universities and institutions all over the country. not getur money does spent in bethesda, but gets spent in those great universities where you are hearing every day about medical breakthroughs. that is because nih supported the work. how long have you been at nih? guest: 20 years ago is when i got here. we were working on the human genome project. p
labs. andft the area of research am now pursuing a career in science policy. i am working with a public education advocacy group in the district. i was wondering if you have any suggestions for early career scientists. how should we keep moving forward in these next couple of years? it is going to remain tough, even if we reach some sort of a deal. are the voice that i am most concerned about. i am glad you are moving in science policy. we need expertise there. many people in your situation would like to continue to do research and are finding it challenging to identify the path forward for them to do so. nih, we're doing everything we can to provide that kind of support. we are increasing the grants that are a bridge between a postdoctoral fellowship and an independent faculty position. we are making it possible for individuals that come in for their first nih grant application to only compete against each other instead of the established investigators that may have more of a track record. trying to give first-time investigators a leg up. thatl have to recognize while this is a histori
and science at the three years. here is easton on tuesday released its two thousand and twelve assessments of the five hundred and ten thousand students from sixty five countries and territories japanese institute that and all three areas compared to two thousand and nine. agency has dominated the top ranking believe this is a teams from shanghai came first in all categories as they did in two thousand i con con place second in reading and science and third in math. spread on academic testing has this to say the students teenagers seem to have a strong belief that with mosley took place in a high ranking university which in turn leads to a stable future. this is because as stated in developed countries tend to be less motivated to study he says the japanese government needs to come up with ways to foster an interest in learning. i knew i. a demon that are breaking with tradition are finding jobs in workplaces traditionally dominated by men but challenges remain even for women who are skilled acceptance in the workplace may be some time coming. any scale a skill called to reports. cute and
and applied skills in math and science to be three years and urbanization on tuesday released its two thousand and twelve assessment of five hundred ten thousand students from sixty five countries and territories. japanese students did better in all three areas compared to two thousand and nine. asian students dominated the top ranks in the latest survey teams from chennai. i came first in all categories as they did in two thousand and nine. hong kong placed second in reading and science and third in that. an expert on academic testing has this to say the students in asia seem to have a strong belief that with mosley took place in a high ranking university which in turn leads to a stable future. professor for the sustenance and a balk countries tend to be less motivated to study he says the japanese government is to come up with ways to foster an interest in learning the chinese government leaders are trying to contain what they see as rebels who want to split the country some members of the muslim community of wheat beers are demanding autonomy in response violent attacks have been launched t
parents did, to pursue careers in medicine, science, education. many are proud business owners of law firms, restaurants, grocery stores, shipping companies and hair braiding venues. there are those who have come as asylum seekers, feeling war, famine and again side. they come to the united states to become productive tax paying members of our society. and like the other immigrant groups, immigrants are dealing with the back logged immigration processing, families being ripped apart, falling out of status because they were eeked out. racial and status discrimination, felony laws that prohibit judicial review, deportation processes that violate human rights and prohibitive student visa programs limited access to work permits and much, much more. mr. speaker, it is imperative for us to acknowledge the fact that many immigrants arrive on our shores during a time in their lives when they are most productive. the most productive years in their lives. bringing them to the floor would deny us as a nation the opportunity to access their talent, their skill and abilities in the prime of their
in this gray area of law and science, and there are plenty of patients eager to follow the trail he's blazing. the ones we talked to in las vegas, all eager to remain young and vital, consider this a lifestyle choice, and they're prepared to roll the dice. you aren't concerned that five years from now, somebody might do a study and find out that this regimen accelerates the growth of cancer cells or causes diabetes? >> well, that's happened with prescriptive drugs. i mean, has it not? so this is any-- in any field you're doing this. they're taken drugs off the market because of this. >> so you'd rather feel better now while you're living your life than worry about the possibly downside 10 or 15 years from now? >> you could get killed on the interstate tomorrow. i mean, my goodness. i mean, it's-- you have to weigh risks and rewards. you do that every day in life. you do it when you get up in the morning. >> are you sure, are you absolutely positive, absent any scientific studies, that the treatments that you're giving now won't prove to be detrimental to someone's health five, 10, 15 years fr
. >> let's talk about this with pane, a professor of political science at a university. he joins me from bangkok. what do you think he's up to. >> what do i think about? >> what do you think suthep thaugsuban is up to? he was addressing the thai people in the last hour. he's not going to go into politics. the movement is not over. he wants to see the end of the thaksin. what is his end game? >> i think the people on the street want a better election system, and they want the government to hear their demand more clearly. i think in the last half hour, they are beginning to consider to apply people's assembly within the constitution, and to accommodate the demands. that is - even this is true, it's a good move from the government. the people from all political groups in thailand are concerned with the elections not reflecting all their concerns. they are 45 million eligible workers in thailand out of 65 million. 75% of those came out working last time. 35 million people, in fact. 15 million for the government party. and another 12 million voting for the democrat party. the two parties are
science monitor. walden,esentative greg on to make haitians and technology. communications and technology. >> a several live events to tell you about tomorrow morning. treasury secretary jack lew will be at the future will trust to discuss the state of financial reform. also on c-span2, members of the house and energy commerce subcommittee on energy and power will hear from energy regulatory commissioners. span330 eastern a.m. on c- we cover a hearing on unemployment benefits that are set to expire at the end of the month. >> from age eight, betty ford, then betty [inaudible] put on skits and plays and that led to eddington, vermont where she studied at the school of dance. these are some of her notecards. no bookstworks -- where she kept cards. she carried this with her to vermont, back to grand rapids, off to new york where she studied with martha graham and work with the powers modeling agency and back to grand rapids again. you will find a host of things that you would find in just about any organizer. brochures on dance costumes, one of her sketches of a costume for one of the dance
to it that arises on the base i think it will fail but not for state elections state powers. the science that tradition this is a time to open. i know. i eye. sure or scolding the book is a rusty so uber rock show. two of the markham site. speed is director since two thousand and six. still makes show up all the students arrive on time with them i still get to it. one last ditch bid to show good in maths he is the issue the local cpa which to distribute the little one up on it. as a scene that improvements in its educational services before to follow that up by two thousand won only fifty thousands of white meat in children's court where tourists. this is international intervention beginners reason to eight million including premium goes up. but with five million children still out of school. dustin government is working hard to provide them i see the ducks this dish for the doctor who but a lot of it well he grows up. you see. but ago. all twenty of those the idea that it is the most honest i didn't add up. the central issue. so sit back and you're kinda itchy and what not to know what
media. the store was opened on the computers and smash it. science labs reports said. i never write about it often at least we had this to austin on monday it's been ages i mean by that time the campus of us and some spoons allegedly belonging to an al qaeda and eight. the best of from the university hostel in september he was in it. most of the seventeen soccer world cup in twenty seventeen the chief executives' committee which met in the business at the outside but about half as the vaunted that this gene is dominant and yet had the odd it was because of azerbaijan and south africa. it may be the biggest soccer thought of it it gets posted the president said dr said this was of enormous importance for the time to bond point two billion people in sporting political and geopolitical tabs. this is the site. this is book be a big weekend for i need to thank the chief executives' committee but keeping the cross hamas and bombed in depth the bikes who was presenting on the same woke up from the federal industry minister and president of the all india football federation said. i actually
now from bangkok is a professor of political science at the university. and thank you very much for making it on the show. now, we have got the prime minister who dissolved the parliament and early elections called and they want no more of the clan, is that really possible in thai politics? >> well, they are working hard to negotiate, to make sure that the influence of the shinawatra family is reduced and not sure it will happened in the future but demonstrators are hoping that they are demanding that the new elections should be with improved mechanisms to reduce the influence of the family and hoping for and we are listening, waiting to listen to the announcement from the leader of the protest movement in the next few minutes. >> there could be a little confusion here for those of us who are not familiar with thai politics, do antiprotesters want no more of the clan or bring the monarchy back and do away with democracy? >> well, i think the main objective of the -- what the so called people's democratic reform committee is to make sure that they have a better political reform i
devotion to yanukovich was the prime minister and wanting to use science to the president said the new coach at the stein i did took on too so that's why if they were peacefully protesting at the stein is only a track record at two zero there was a dog auctions of people who achilles about yanukovich his decision to side will withdraw sure it's good to see ukraine come more into the russian sphere of influence what where are those people i mean it's like fifty percent are fought by its said that we don't know you did that but we might know is that at the local launch and ties with russia are not anti european and deploy your rookie year and i'm not a station the auntie rach. the question is that they advanced towards russia and russia. these last months used french so there is a kind of dependency the ukrainian people and get it on to lose and even duma what you think. yanukovich can too. i mean the pa from results of thought into heavy handed tactics. what else could he do to to try and spot so often million people use or if it's a brave the snow in and take to the streets i think i t
for the purpose of teaching branches of art, science, and industry, best calculated to enable the scholars to acquire an independent livelihood. recognizing the importance of being able to move beyond the menial work and menial wages to which most women of the day were subject, john simmons has enabled generations of women to lead and self advocate, empowered with their own resources. those of us who have delighted so enormously from john simmons's philanthropy are delighted to be with you to witness the work of our founders contemporary, angelina grimke. we hope you enjoy the evening, and thank you for joining us. [applause] >> we have got some powerhouses in the audience with us tonight. not just here on the stage. we want to acknowledge some of the remarkable women officeholders who are present as well as their male allies. i will ask each group to stand and remain standing. please hold your applause until the end. i know that is going to be tough but really try. we are honored to have present tonight a number of women who were each the first woman to hold a different statewide office.
of those units. >> i think this is political theatre. >> uc berkeley political science professor steven weber says it really doesn't matter why they detained him. what matters is that he's now in north korea's custody. although no one is going to say out loud that's what it is, both sides know exactly that's what it is. >> how this will play out weber says is uncertain pop i do think there's some fatigue in washington, d.c. at providing concessions to the north koreans every time they kind of create some trouble, we give them something. >> kimberly, thank you. >> vice president joe biden has a week-long trip planned to asia this week, including a stop in south korea. this is video of him in panama two weeks ago. he plans to participate in a ceremony honoring u.s. troops who died during the korean war. there's no word at this point if he plans to discuss with anyone the arrest of merrill newman. there's a statement that asks for the release of merrill newman as well as kenneth bay, another american held in the communist country. we are following the story at nbc bay area.com. type in det
for courts to overturn convictions based on science that is later debunked so on november 18th the san antonio four reunited and meeting the granddaughter for the first time and ready to makeup for lost time. >> it was a death in the family and births. marriages and just so many things over the years that we have missed. >> reporter: the road aheld won't be easy, the women have been released but not exonerated and there is that to fight, jobs to find and lives to rebuild. the four say as long as they stick together they will do all that and more. heidi docastra al jazeera san antonio. >> more than 2000 people who were wrongfully convicted have been exonerated in the past two decades and spent an average of ten years in prison and 30% of them have been exonerated by dna evidence. the president obama and first ladder were there and billy joel and santana and oprah singer, jazz musician herbie joncock and these are performers who influenced culture through the arts. and the flash mob military style, the u.s. airforce ban surprised visitors at the washington and space museum and it starte
social sciences and the city is just a few station has attracted lots of listeners not just women but also men who take it in turns to dj at the sight of all of that and you can top of the savannah. at the time but you have any of those last sunday said it was this beautiful beach i've almost got. afghanistan is that it means to be the conservative society. the folders have got access to the gk the taleban have recently for some girls schools to close those women who do miss is to get on that in life have had to work hard for it that was of the condiment of the pack i did have a bobble on the day and for me smile against us. on the fact that i caught a fish right up to one such was the first. i don't check the sake of a contract with the time i make at evening's end of this the buffet that is good and the sunna. connell economy cannot buy the bottom section of the covenant and emotion love. you try getting more than just arrived. they're getting in each case. thanks to an initiative of the hebrew university of jerusalem and israel railways train passengers are treated to a lecture
recognizes the gentleman from alabama, mr. brooks, for five minutes. mr. speaker, the science space and technology committee recently held a hearing on healthcare.gov cybersecurity threats. our bipartisan expert witness panel included dr. frederick check, a computer science professor at s.m.u., dr. ruben, a computer science professor at johns hopkins university, david kennedy, former chief security officer of dibold incorporated and currently the principal security consultant for trusted sec, and morgan write, formerly with cisco security and now c.e.o. of crowd sourced investigations. now i'm not a cybersecurity expert, but i can read the words of those who are. the s.s.t. committee's hearing charter informs members that in order to fully use healthcare.gov, american citizens must input or verify highly personal information such as date of birth and social security numbers for all family members, household salary, debt information, credit card information, place of employment, home addresses, and the like. information that is a treasure-trove for cybercriminals and identity thieves
basically met at a science fair in london, the delegates, and met a young canadian women, 16. we met at the hospital. and i had taken a year off between high-school going to oxford. i would visitor. so i worked, you know, oddly enough in north london. oftentimes. to earn enough money to go and see her. i arrived in montreal in the early 1952. and then after a little while there was this huge continent beyond. so my parents dismayed when they learned about it, hitchhiking to vancouver. not a very long time, people were very nice. some dispatch. and then i decided to go and have a look at america. been fascinated by any english child, the cisco kid and champion and all of those kinds of programs. so i entered the united states. the time of blame in washington state. the first time i remember seeing , the incident as its i looked bewildered. stopped and picked me up. so would you like to come to seattle. that was the beginning of a series of unbelievable things which -- i visited every single state in the union, well, at least a lie, everyone in the continental u.s. i traveled -- i thin
you offer is this. >> you can learn things focussing on technology and computer science, being computer literate and so on to go and learn about big data or about how to do stuff on the web. you learn this online. go there, sign up and take a class. some of our classes are free. we also offer services such as mentoring, coaching and examination. you work with google and facebook to put their materials online. we get from them the most up to date, cutting edge stuff you need to know to be successful in the career of tech. you can learn this stuff. facebook teaches internally to it's engineers. so if you as a person want to be proficient in big data, go and sign up. >> does this replace a college degree or someone in the work place can use to add on a constant life learning, learning, learning? >> we think of it like a letter like continued learning, life long learning, staying up to date. our data suggests that too. very few come to us straight out of college or in college. most come to us, young professionals that want to understand the latest and best in technology. things tur
differently, though, it seems. >> yes. the science is still very much not conclusive regarding that. there have been no real solid tests of these kinds of devices which can be manipulated to have a lot of nicotine, a little bit of nicotine and new york city is really kind of following the lead of many, many -- well, many jurisdictions throughout the country and three states. currently 20 million americans live in states or local jurisdictions where tobacco products are treated just like e cigarettes. and we're just kind of catching up. we think it's important to not have a situation where we're renormalizing the act of smoking. and also gets in the way of us doing proper -- proper enforcement of the current anti-smoking bills we have now, because they look-alike. this is causing confusion. we want to err on the side of caution as many states and localities have already done. we think this is a prudent next step to make sure we do not renormalize smoking and have people subject to these vapors which are very much unknown. >> thinking back to the original smoking ban you referred to,
is a better term, and industry science-based? >> i appreciate that question a great deal. the answer is we have put in place a number of new policy components that will begin to allow us to cover the entire. and it. i don't think we'll ever find the time when the american health sector diminishes in terms of imports and its reliance on technology. we are technologically driven in this country and that is a great asset in many respects, but a liability as well. it is an asset in that we've allowed the most technological means to be used in some cases that it made a difference. some people confuse our technology with our system, our marketplace. we have the best in the world. but we don't have the best sector in the world if you look at any performance criteria. i think we're the best technology in the world. a lot of people around the world want to access that technology. succumb to the united states to be able to do that. but what this law does and what i think a growing consensus, even in the private sector outside the law acknowledges that if we are really going to make a difference in t
do to a security wise. we have to look at this is a very real threat no matter how science fiction does to think about that happening. it could easily happen and it's our job to stop it. >> colon the gene tweets in represented hunter iran has not invaded another country for more than 200 years. they have a right to defend themselves. what do you say to that argument? >> guest: iran has invaded other countries through proxy terrorists. they are in a whole lot of places doing bad things. they are in afghanistan so they haven't invaded because that is not with these countries do. with these countries do is end when i say countries i'm in countries like afghanistan prewar and iran have proxy wars and a fund to promote and train bad actors in their state bad bad actors in their state and send them out to other countries to destabilize those countries and kill and maim people. husk of the front page of "the new york times" and don't know if you saw this story. groups gain in turmoil across the mideast. violence has presented new opportunities for jihadist groups across the middle east to
know this looks like science fiction. it's not. >> wow. >> this is early. this is still years away. drops the package. >> there's the package. >> come and get your package. we can do half-hour delivery. >> half-hour delivery? >> half-hour delivery and carry objects we think up to five pounds. >> that service amazon prime air could be ready for use in four or five years and could carry objects to discuss merles within a ten-mile radius of a distribution center. when's the worst that could happen? tweet us. we'll get your responses later on in the morning. people had ideas already about worse worst-case scenarios. >> try landing in the streets in manhattan. >> yes. >> the other thing is have you noticed how innocent they look? cute little drones. as time goes on, you can see it's the future. presumably they're armed or they'll -- >> hellfires on there. >> did you see quot blif i don't know" with tom cruise? >> no. it was a part of "homeland." >> i won't give away more. >> thank you very much. they keep innovating and, carl, we have seen apparently they're not the first to think about
Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24